Joseph V Higbee.com

Cabin Lake, Oregon

2005 through 2014


   I have been to Cabin Lake five times before and hope to go again this year. If you are looking for the lake in the satellite photos below, you are several thousand years too late, or so they tell me.
   These satellite photos shows the location where the photos in this section were taken. Like all photos on this website, hovering the mouse over it will show the title, clicking on it will bring up a bigger photo in an overlay. Clicking the X in the upper right hand corner of the overlay will collapse it.
Map Map Looking at the two photos above it can be seen that Cabin Lake is right on the transition line between open pine forest on the north and west and open high desert on the south and east. Very dry, less than 10" annual rainfall, with no natural fed standing or running water for several miles, making the water holes very attractive to the birds and small animals in the area. Larger animals are fenced out.
Blind locations Upper blind layout
These photos show the layout of the two watering holes and blinds. The white rectangles are the water collection and storage units for them. The campground just to the north is primitive, no water, no toilets and, most of the year, no fires. Pack it in, pack it out, PLEASE! A campground with facilities is located at Fort Rock, about ten miles south. Top of page

The First Trip in July, 2005


   I was first introduced to this location by a fellow birder from Oregon. We had travelled through and past some beautiful birding spots getting there. This didn't look like any of them! When we pulled into the primitive campground, I wondered how we could ever see more than a few dry land species. Within the next hour, I lost all such concern. Here, then, are some photos I took in the slightly more than one day I spent there.
Cassin's Finch at waterhole Green-tailed Towhee at waterhole Red Crossbill at waterhole
The Green-tailed Towhee was a life bird, the Cassin's Finch missed that by one quick glance a year previous and the Red Crossbill must be the supersize type 6.
Lewis's Woodpecker in tree Chipping Sparrow at waterhole Butterfly at waterhole
The Green-tailed Towhee was a life bird, the Cassin's Finch missed that by one quick glance a year previous and the Red Crossbill must be the supersize type 6.
Belding's Ground Squirrel at waterhole Female Northern Flicker on bush Audubon's Warbler at waterhole
The Lewis Woodpecker is seen here from time to time but this trip was the only one when I saw one. The Chipping Sparrow was no surprise and is abundant but the butterfly was unexpected and I almost missed it.
Brewer's Sparrow Morman Fritillary butterfly Least Chipmunk at waterhole
Belding's Ground Squirrel only this time at the waterhole but see them here and there in the area. Flicker and butterbutt are common.
Western Bluebird Dusky Flycatcher White-headed Woodpecker in waterhole
Brewer's Sparrow is common,and the Least Chipmunk shares the area with the look alike Yellow Pine Chipmunk.
Pygmy Nuthatch Clark's Nutcracker Mourning Dove
Pygmy Nuthatch, Clark's Nutcracker and Mourning Dove were seen often.


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